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Using Solution Focused Therapy in Schools

Updated: Mar 15, 2023

Solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) is a client-centered approach that emphasizes the strength and resources of the clients to resolve their problems. It focuses on the present and future rather than the past, and emphasizes small and achievable goals. SFBT has been used successfully in various fields like mental health, social work, and coaching, and is gaining popularity in the school setting as well.


Using SFBT in Schools

SFBT is a promising approach for schools because it aligns with the strengths-based approach and positive psychology that emphasises building on student's strengths and resources. In schools, SFBT can be used to promote student well-being, academic performance, and engagement.


Some of the ways in which SFBT can be used in schools are:


1. Problem-solving meetings: SFBT can be used to conduct problem-solving meetings with students who are struggling academically or behaviorally. These meetings can be facilitated by school counselors, teachers, or administrators and can help students identify their strengths, set achievable goals, and develop action plans to achieve them.


2. Student-led conferences: SFBT can be used to facilitate student-led conferences whereby students take the lead in discussing their academic progress, strengths, and areas of improvement. This can help increase student engagement and ownership of their learning.


3. Positive feedback and recognition: SFBT emphasizes giving positive feedback and recognition to students for their strengths and achievements. This can help build self-esteem, motivation, and a positive school culture.


4. Strengths-based interventions: SFBT can be used to develop strengths-based interventions for students who are struggling academically or behaviorally. For example, if a student is struggling with math, the intervention can focus on building on the student's strengths in other subjects and using those strengths to improve math performance.


5. Parent-teacher conferences: SFBT can be used to facilitate parent-teacher conferences whereby the focus is on strengths, resources, and solutions rather than problems and deficits.


Conclusion

SFBT is a promising approach for schools that aligns with the strengths-based approach and positive psychology. It can be used to promote student well-being, academic performance, and engagement by facilitating problem-solving meetings, student-led conferences, providing positive feedback and recognition, developing strengths-based interventions, and facilitating parent-teacher conferences.


As schools increasingly adopt a strengths-based approach, SFBT can be a valuable tool to enhance student success and well-being.




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